Paralympic Power, Art and Greece



Share 'Paralympic Power, Art and Greece' on Delicious Share 'Paralympic Power, Art and Greece' on Digg Share 'Paralympic Power, Art and Greece' on Facebook Share 'Paralympic Power, Art and Greece' on Google+ Share 'Paralympic Power, Art and Greece' on LinkedIn Share 'Paralympic Power, Art and Greece' on Pinterest Share 'Paralympic Power, Art and Greece' on reddit Share 'Paralympic Power, Art and Greece' on StumbleUpon Share 'Paralympic Power, Art and Greece' on Twitter Share 'Paralympic Power, Art and Greece' on Add to Bookmarks Share 'Paralympic Power, Art and Greece' on Email Share 'Paralympic Power, Art and Greece' on Print Friendly

The Paralympics have been in full swing for three days and we say – go!! – to everyone involved – and congrats to all winners, past and present. The link between sport and art may not seem so obvious, but it was the quest for the classical athletic body that gave rise to all of those ancient, Mediterranean-based marble representations, in other words, Greek statues. The revival of classical sculptures, art and architecture defined the Renaissance, which in turn gave form to the modern world. Now that those words are out, I pose the question: isn’t it time we returned the Olympic games to their place of origin?

 

It is over 100 years since Pierre de Coubertin achieved his monumental goal of bringing the Olympic ideal of competitive sport to all corners of the globe; this task has run its course. Today, worldwide tournaments in all areas of sport abound, giving every nation a chance to excel at an endeavour. But we have Greece to thank for the Olympic games, and in a time when that economically-battered country needs to rebuild its identity, there is no need to look further than this millennia-old legacy. Only one, large investment is needed; every Olympiad would see a higher economic return than the previous one. Most significantly, the Olympics would be uniquely Greek again.

 

On that note, this season’s marathon of art exhibitions is about to begin; watch this space.

(ed. 2016)

About Mary Phelan

I am an art historian, magazine editor and design philosopher. In addition to editing Artyonline, I have my own website, http://www.maryphelan.info/ and write a blog, Design Victim, on the pain and pleasure of encountering designed objects in modern life. http://maryphelan.blogspot.com/ Readers can also follow my latest Hub Pages article that provides directions on how to create Ray Lichtenstein-type images using computer drawing software. http://hubpages.com/hub/Draw-Like-Lichtenstein-Using-Computer-Graphic-Software